Resources for Writers

ABOUT PLAYWRITING

Listed below are only a few of the many websites, blogs and resources available to assist you with your playwriting endeavors. If you know of any that should be added to the list, please let me know (jwhill@jeanettehill.com)

 

THE BUSINESS SIDE

Whether you dream of your play appearing on the Great White Way (Broadway) or it’s just for the family’s Juneteenth reunion if will require strategic planning. If you are like me you enjoy the writing and production aspects of playwriting but shrink back a little at taking care of business. There are people, organizations and websites  that are much better prepared to give you the information you need to be a success on both the creative and business side of the process.

www.copyright.gov for plays use Form PA

www.dramatistsguild.com

 

THE CRAFT SIDE

Whether you are new to playwriting or you have written more plays than you can remember, I don’t believe you can learn too much. Sometimes it’s a good idea to go back to basics. Learning how it’s done and what to do with it once it’s done is information that will benefit you throughout your writing journey.  Nothing will ever take the place of good old fashioned BIT (Butt In Seat) writing- no matter how much you read you still have to write.  However, research learning and development will greatly improve your writing. Below you’ll find websites that provide valuable information on both playwriting and writing in general. New sites will be added as we go along.

www.playwriting101.com

www.writersdigest.com

 

INFORMATION AND SUPPORT

One of the most important things that you can do as a playwright is to attend plays, all kinds Broadway if you can get there but if not, community or regional theater works and don’t discount local church productions. There is some fantastic theater being done in local churches and not just the mega ones. . Don’t forget to su, local theater, even church produ Periodically take some time t

www.davidetalbert.com

www.gdavisplays.com

www.sasprod.org (shameless plug!)

www.urbanplaywrightsunited.com

Read what others have to say about writing, particularly as it applies to you culturally and in the Faith, Inspiration and Christian areas. There are a number of new blogs addressing these and other topics. Check them out and find a few on your own that you’d like to follow, you never know…you may find your own special swagger! Here are a list of several writing blogs to check out:

www.writtenvoicesblog.com

www.letusbearfruit.com

Suggested Plays

Their Eyes were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

‘Night Mother by Marsha Norman

Fences by August Wilson

BOOKS for YOUR PERSONAL LIBRARY
(writing requires investing in yourself)

FORMATTING AND SUBMITTING YOUR MANUSCRIPT by Chuck Sambuchino

NAKED PLAYWRITING by William Missouri Downs and Robin U. Russin

WRITING THE PICTURE by Robin U. Russin and William Missouri Downs

THE WRITER’S IDEA BOOK by Jack Heffron

NEW WRITING EXERCISE!!!

You will routinely find writing exercises here. It may be character development, plot analysis or just a ‘What If?’ scenario. They are intended for your enjoyment as well as a way to hone your skills. You are welcome to share what you come up with us! This time around we are starting with a “What Happens Next?” exercise. You are given the bare bones of an event or conversation and you fill in the blanks.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

Observation is a very valuable skill in writing of any kind but particularly in playwriting because it is a visual art. Writers are always looking for inspiration or ideas…everywhere! The way someone walks, clothing, facial expressions, voice inflections and accents, catchy phrases, snippets of conversation are all placed into the hard drive of our minds for future reference if not for immediate use. Some people would call it being nosy, others call it people watching, I think of it as being attentive.

You never know where the next idea for a script or story will originate.  Below are two lines of conversation. You decide the setting and situation. Complete the conversation as you would ‘see’ it in a short scene. Let us know what you come up with! Who knows it may be the start of a fresh project!

MARK One of us has to tell her!

ANDREW Man, this is a career-breaker. How did Stan find out?